I fuckin’ miss him.

John G Creelman -my dad. As remebered By Nancy Morrison

dad_vintFram “John Creelman was a rich man – rich in all the ways that matter. He was a loving son – his mother Constance, still alive and feisty in Toronto, who has lost a son before his time.

He has been a cherished brother to Louise and Wye, and cherished also by their husbands and their children, John’s nieces and nephews,

To Lyn’s family, John has been a wonderful son, brother, a rock – always there, always positive.

Most of all, John has been a husband, who adored his Lyn, and a loving, ever-present father to Allison and Patrick, whose very names brought aglow of pride and love to his face.

His family – his legacy, his pride and joy.

John’s ability to love and share included all of us – his friends from all walks of life.

With John – you were a friend for life.

It wasn’t anything you discussed with him. You just always knew he was there for you. When Bruno dies so suddenly, one of the first people at the door was John, who had driven down from Whistler to say, “What can I do?”

Realizing he was looking at someone who didn’t know if it was Tuesday, or Main Street – John quietly assumed those roles that Tim and Toby and Mike and Dave and others have done this week, picking up people from the airport, buying the booze, renting the glasses, contacting people, setting up the wake.

We began John’s wake last night. He would have liked that.

The tales from the life-long friends – Doug Caldwell, Mike Robbins, and Dave MacKean – who swears he’s been practicing those bagpipes.

Allison and Patrick will hear more of those stories today from all who loved their dad. And Allison may need an extra hug, because today is her birthday.

And I will leave those stories for the wake – why he was called Angel in those early days, how none of the guys ever felt they looked as cool as John, no matter how many dollars they threw at Harry Rosen, and the early convertibles, and skiing on those easter pimples they call mountains.

I have known John since we were 21, when he and his friends discovered I had a seemingly endless supply of good-looking roommates from the west. He met them all, no one won his heart until he met Lyn. From that he never recovered.

John kept a balance in his life. He was never too busy for family or friends; he knew how to work and how to play, to share that wonderful smile, laugh, that sense of humour. Humour that was never at anyone’s expense.

In these last few months, when John’s short term memory was gone, but never his sweetness or gentleness, there were some truly lovely and funny moments, as he asked me his ever-thoughtful, but forgetful questions. He would ask me how my love life was, and Bruno – and be devastated that Bruno was gone. He would say, grieving, “But I wasn’t there for you.” “But you were,” I’d reassure him, “and you gave him a great send-off, John.”

As we are going to give John today.

In his work, whether advertising or real estate, John never went for the jugular. That would have been alien to the generosity and wisdom of his soul.

In all the years I have known John, I never heard him say an unkind word about anyone, nor have I heard anyone say such of him. He did not know how to be harsh or judgemental. It was not his nature.

When I say John’s life had balance – you know what I mean. In addition to his work, he always had time to go camp[ing with his kids, skiing with Lyn, and golf – his not-so-secret passion.

Many of us here today were at Whistler a couple of years ago for John’s 60th birthday party. It was a rollicking affair, Lyn being the super hostess, Patrick making sure no one had an empty glass, Allison cooking up a storm in the kitchen.

The laughing speeches were over, and in a quiet moment for John, in the midst of the din, I watched as he looked over at Lyn, who was chatting with friends, and the look on John’s face was one of pure love.

Many of you may not have known John’s lifelong faith with his church. He slipped into Mass regularly, and his faith was his alone – not something he trumpeted about – just something that shaped his days, sustained his soul.

There was a spirituality to John, that goodness and gentleness that seems like a rare commodity in our world.

He made us better by being in our world. He gave and never asked for anything back.

GOD SPEED JOHN. WE LOVE YOU.

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